Lord Justice Leveson has advised consumers on the permanent implications social media can have, dawn.com reports.

So in 2020 was he correct from 2012?

Following on from the publication into his report on media ethics, Lord Leveson has claimed that many individuals and businesses can sometimes see social media content as a place for throwaway comments that exist only in the short-term.

Instead, Lord Leveson claimed that individuals should ensure they better manage social media content, to ensure the long-term implications are positive.

Using the example of uploading a photograph, Lord Leveson told stuff.co.nz: “Children and the young do not appreciate that uploading a compromising photograph for a laugh can have serious consequences for the long-term future because once the photograph is in the public domain it can be found, copied and reproduced, all, again, at the click of the mouse.”

He added that once this has taken place, it would be “difficult if not impossible” to retrieve every copy in the future and, provided a buy v researcher is tenacious, they should easily be able to find it.

Twitter Troll. Trolling can lead to serious consequences.

This is not just true of children uploading pictures to their social networks, but brands who could see ill-thought-out content returning to haunt them.

As this information can be replicated, even if the original source is deleted, brands would be wise to consider more careful social media management in order to prevent such eventualities from happening, long before they have the chance to.

“There is not only a danger of ‘trial by Twitter,” Lord Leveson concluded, “but also of unending punishment, and no prospect of rehabilitation via Google.”