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Instagram – Reels and Where Your Images Go

Instagram – Reels and Where Your Images Go

Tips for using reels

Use Native Reels Tools to Create Your Content

Instagram reels have editing tools, music, and visual effects to add to our videos. And Instagram recommends that you use them. In true Instagram fashion, once they’ve released a new feature, they really want you to use that feature and will boost your exposure if you often use that feature and the tools on the app related to that feature.

Therefore, to maximize your reach, you should record, edit, and add effects to your Instagram reels from within the app, rather than uploading a video you’ve recorded somewhere else.

Keep Your Instagram Reels Looking Native

Instagram reels don’t work if they don’t look native. Recorded them in portrait (or vertical) orientation using your smartphone’s full screen. rather than encased in a frame, or set horizontally.

If you want to repurpose a video you recorded for a different channel or with a different orientation into an Instagram reel. it’s going to take a little bit more work than simply posting it. Kind of how a Facebook post doesn’t quite work on Twitter.

Besides this, according to Instagram, a recent survey of its users revealed that those Instagram reels that had been repurposed or uploaded from sources outside of the Instagram app looked blurry and the watermarks placed on them from the other apps were distracting and made the user experience less enjoyable.

I have not experienced a blurry Instagram reel after repurposing my content from another app. Therefore, I can’t speak to the accuracy of that claim. These issues may not be widespread.

Are you signing away your pictures?

When you first click on the site, this banner appears “Set your Instagram free! 3506 people are releasing their Instagram photos under a Creative Commons license.”
Do you automatically want to share your photos with others?
Are you setting your photos Free, or just letting people use them Free?

 

In the true spirit of sharing, your Instagram photos can now become a part of the expansive digital commons. I Am CC,  a third-party app created by developer Philip Neustrom, appends a selected Creative Commons (CC) license to Instagram photos, enabling users to release their work to be freely shared while still retaining their rights.

Flickr inspired the app. Which has comprehensive features for CC-licensing photos and videos. and for searching for such content.

Flickr case study

“Making my photos available on Flickr using a CC-license has made wonderful things happen. They have been used in classrooms, in books, and on blogs, my photos also illustrate articles in Wikipedia or help charities’ fund-raising campaigns.” — Lars Plougmann.

Instagram, the free-of-cost, mobile-only photo-sharing program, and social network, has over 80 million users, and over 1 billion photos uploaded in its feed. Even if a fraction of these photos are made available under a CC license to the public, it could lead to the making of a voluminous repository of free images that could be built upon, modified, remixed, or used as they are. As Neustrom suggests, such a repository could make a huge impact on the free culture movement.

According to Instagram’s terms of use, the copyright of every Instagram photo belongs to its owner but Instagram can choose to use it. Another use is that Instagramographers can establish their rights across the different platforms on which their images are shared.

We hope that I Am CC, like Flickr. Enables users with applying for licenses selectively to their photos. It would only befit the essence of social media – create, share, remix, & share.

But what do you think? Would you want people you have never met using your photos?

for more information on privacy in loving social media

All Instagram(tm) logos and trademarks displayed on this website are property of Instagram, Inc.
This website is not affiliated with or endorsed or certified by Creative Commons.



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